PODCAST! – Cult TV! and Best Of! and Looking Back at “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Seasons 6-7: The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode 4 (MAJOR SPOILERS) + Best Written TV (#49)

Image result for buffy the vampire slayer title card season 3

Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who: “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” a cult supernatural, fantasy, action, and horror drama that aired on the Warner Bros. network, or “The WB,” from 1997 to 2001 and on the United Paramount Network, or “UPN,” from 2001-2003.

What: “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” follows Buffy Summers (Sarah Michelle Gellar), the latest in a line of young women known as “Vampire Slayers” or simply “Slayers,” called or chosen by fate to battle against vampires, demons, and other forces of darkness.

SYNOPSIS

Buffy’s mystical calling endows her with powers that dramatically enhance physical strength, endurance, agility, healing, intuition, and that provide a limited degree of clairvoyance, usually in the form of prophetic dreams. She is known as a reluctant hero who wants to live a normal life; however, she learns to embrace her destiny as the vampire Slayer.  Buffy receives guidance from her Watcher, Rupert Giles (Anthony Stewart Head), a member of the Watchers’ Council, whose job is to train and guide the Slayers. Giles researches the supernatural creatures that Buffy must face, offers insights into their origins and advice on how to defeat them, and helps her stay in fighting form. Buffy is also helped by friends she meets at Sunnydale High School: Willow Rosenberg (Alyson Hannigan) and Xander Harris (Nicholas Brendon).

The cast of characters grows over the course of the series. A vampire with a soul, Angel (David Boreanaz), is Buffy’s love interest throughout the first three seasons. At Sunnydale High, Buffy meets several other students besides Willow and Xander willing to join her fight for good, an informal group eventually tagged the “Scooby Gang” or “Scoobies.” Cordelia Chase (Charisma Carpenter), the archetypal shallow cheerleader, reluctantly becomes involved. Daniel “Oz” Osbourne (Seth Green) – a fellow student, rock guitarist and werewolf – joins the group through his relationship with Willow. Anya (Emma Caulfield), a former vengeance demon (Anyanka) who specialized in avenging scorned women, becomes Xander’s lover after losing her powers and joins the group in season four. Spike (James Marsters), a vampire, is an old companion of Angelus (Angel) and one of Buffy’s major enemies in early seasons, although they later become allies and lovers.  In fact, Buffy features dozens of recurring characters, both major and minor, and additional regular characters introduced in later seasons.

When: The show aired on the WB from 1997-2001 and on UPN from 2001-2003.

Where: The show is set primarily in fictional Sunnydale, California, home of one of the series’ fictional entrances to hell, otherwise known as “The Hellmouth.”

Why: Listen to the first episode of this podcast series for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  They are all personal and occasionally touching.

How – as in How Much Do We Love this Show?!

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the premiere of one of your Chief CP’s all-time favorite television shows, and since I know a few people in my life who love Buffy as much or (possibly) more than I do, I decided to invite some true Buffy-Verse scholars, in what has, again, become something of a family event, to participate in a five-part podcast series, during which we will take a critical look back at another couple of cult TV shows that fuel our respective imaginations and tug at our TV-loving hearts. In this five-part series, our panel – featuring CPU! regulars and semi-regulars Nick, Kyle, Sarah, and Kallie – look back at Buffy and its spin-off Angel, reminiscing about two shows that have withstood the test of time as personal favorites for several of us and as two of the most nationally and internationally acclaimed television series of all time.

We have already recorded three episodes in this series, Looking Back at Buffy Seasons One, Two, and Three (Episode One), Four and Five (Episode Two), and Angel, Seasons One and Two (Episode Three).  You can listen to those episodes here or via our audio channels on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, and Google Play:

The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode One, “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Seasons 1-3

The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode Two, “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Seasons 4-5

The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode Three, “Angel,” Seasons 1-2

In this fourth episode of CPU!’s “Buffy-Verse” series, our panel discusses Seasons Six and Seven of Buffy, covering the series’ final two years and the show’s somewhat divisive denouement, after the UPN network began airing the series following possible cancellation by the WB. We discuss our favorite and least favorite episodes within each season and our general impressions of the success of these two seasons, which aired on Tuesday nights on the UPN network.

In addition, with this series, CPU! is introducing yet another brand new feature, which sort of combines some old features into one handily titled, efficiently truncated format. You may have noticed that we tend to favor some “best of” lists around here.  Well, in this new feature, called “Best Of!,” we are going to handily provide, right here, right now for Buffy but otherwise within the content entry for each podcast episode, the list of all of the “best of” acclaims a show receives.  In addition, we will be compiling those lists on separate bonus pages of our website (accessible by the menu at the top left of the header).  We’re not ready for the pages, as in they are under construction, but when it comes to Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s list of various acclaims accrued over the years, you’ll come to understand why this feature was introduced.

To wit, herein be the list of Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s Best Of!

  • #41 on TV Guide’s list of 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time
  • #2 on Empires “50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time” in 2008 and #22 in 2016
  • #27 on The Hollywood Reporters “Hollywood’s 100 Favorite TV Shows”
  • Time magazine’s “100 Best TV Shows of All-Time
  • #38 on TV Guide’s list of the “60 Best Series of All Time”
  • #38 on Rolling Stone’s list of 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time

In addition, Buffy the Vampire Slayer is one of the most celebrated cult TV shows and TV fandoms, as the show ranks at #2 on Entertainment Weekly’s 2009 and 2014 Top Cult TV lists and at #3 on TV Guide’s Top Cult TV list.  Plus, Buffy ranked #49 on TV Guide’s Best Written TV list in 2013, as it is also considered one of the best written (scripted) television series of all time.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, our DCTU panel returns again to the proverbial Water Cooler to discuss Season 3 of The Flash, as our Arrowverse revisits continue.  Stay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Buffy the Vampire Slayer – if you somehow haven’t already watched it – is recommended to anyone who loves nerdy, cult science fiction and fantasy (and/or horror) series in the vein of Star Trek, The X-Files, and similar ilk and to any fan of Joss Whedon who hasn’t somehow discovered his first major and most critically and most popularly recognized work of screen fiction (beyond the vastly different film, for which he provided creative input and an early script later overruled by its producers).  As we discuss in this podcast series, this series broke ground for so many other series to come, including other popular shows for which writers and creators learned their trade working on this series originally, including shows like Once Upon a Time and even issue-based comedies, like the uneven but musical Glee. This show has a bit of everything, and, if you love solid, quality television – excellent television, in fact – and you have somehow missed this series, you should make time for Buffy. You will not be disappointed in the overall journey and entertainment value that this well written, well performed series provides.

The entire Buffy series is available to stream at only Hulu, currently. Watch it: you won’t regret it!

Advertisements

PODCAST! – Cult TV! and Best Of! and Looking Back at “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Seasons 4-5: The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode 2 (MAJOR SPOILERS) + Best Written TV (#49)

Image result for buffy the vampire slayer title card season 3

Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who: “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” a cult supernatural, fantasy, action, and horror drama that aired on the Warner Bros. network, or “The WB,” from 1997 to 2001 and on the United Paramount Network, or “UPN,” from 2001-2003.

What: “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” follows Buffy Summers (Sarah Michelle Gellar), the latest in a line of young women known as “Vampire Slayers” or simply “Slayers,” called or chosen by fate to battle against vampires, demons, and other forces of darkness.

SYNOPSIS

Buffy’s mystical calling endows her with powers that dramatically enhance physical strength, endurance, agility, healing, intuition, and that provide a limited degree of clairvoyance, usually in the form of prophetic dreams. She is known as a reluctant hero who wants to live a normal life; however, she learns to embrace her destiny as the vampire Slayer.  Buffy receives guidance from her Watcher, Rupert Giles (Anthony Stewart Head), a member of the Watchers’ Council, whose job is to train and guide the Slayers. Giles researches the supernatural creatures that Buffy must face, offers insights into their origins and advice on how to defeat them, and helps her stay in fighting form. Buffy is also helped by friends she meets at Sunnydale High School: Willow Rosenberg (Alyson Hannigan) and Xander Harris (Nicholas Brendon).

The cast of characters grows over the course of the series. A vampire with a soul, Angel (David Boreanaz), is Buffy’s love interest throughout the first three seasons. At Sunnydale High, Buffy meets several other students besides Willow and Xander willing to join her fight for good, an informal group eventually tagged the “Scooby Gang” or “Scoobies.” Cordelia Chase (Charisma Carpenter), the archetypal shallow cheerleader, reluctantly becomes involved. Daniel “Oz” Osbourne (Seth Green) – a fellow student, rock guitarist and werewolf – joins the group through his relationship with Willow. Anya (Emma Caulfield), a former vengeance demon (Anyanka) who specialized in avenging scorned women, becomes Xander’s lover after losing her powers and joins the group in season four. Spike (James Marsters), a vampire, is an old companion of Angelus (Angel) and one of Buffy’s major enemies in early seasons, although they later become allies and lovers.  In fact, Buffy features dozens of recurring characters, both major and minor, and additional regular characters introduced in later seasons.

When: The show aired on the WB from 1997-2001 and on UPN from 2001-2003.

Where: The show is set primarily in fictional Sunnydale, California, home of one of the series’ fictional entrances to hell, otherwise known as “The Hellmouth.”

Why: Listen to the first episode of this podcast series for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  They are all personal and occasionally touching.

How – as in How Much Do We Love this Show?!

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the premiere of one of your Chief CP’s all-time favorite television shows, and since I know a few people in my life who love Buffy as much or (possibly) more than I do, I decided to invite some true Buffy-Verse scholars, in what has, again, become something of a family event, to participate in a five-part podcast series, during which we will take a critical look back at another couple of cult TV shows that fuel our respective imaginations and tug at our TV-loving hearts. In this five-part series, our panel – featuring CPU! regulars and semi-regulars Nick, Kyle, Sarah, and Kallie – look back at Buffy and its spin-off Angel, reminiscing about two shows that have withstood the test of time as personal favorites for several of us and as two of the most nationally and internationally acclaimed television series of all time.

We have already recorded one episode in this series, Looking Back at Buffy Seasons One, Two, and Three.  You can listen to that episode here or via our audio channels on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, and Google Play:

The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode One, “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Seasons 1-3

In this second episode of CPU!’s “Buffy-Verse” series, our panel discusses Seasons Four and Five of Buffy, covering the series’ middle years and the arguable apex of its popularity. We discuss our favorite and least favorite episodes within each season and our general impressions of the success of these two seasons, which aired on Tuesday nights on the WB network.

In addition, with this series, CPU! is introducing yet another brand new feature, which sort of combines some old features into one handily titled, efficiently truncated format. You may have noticed that we tend to favor some “best of” lists around here.  Well, in this new feature, called “Best Of!,” we are going to handily provide, right here, right now for Buffy but otherwise within the content entry for each podcast episode, the list of all of the “best of” acclaims a show receives.  In addition, we will be compiling those lists on separate bonus pages of our website (accessible by the menu at the top left of the header).  We’re not ready for the pages, as in they are under construction, but when it comes to Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s list of various acclaims accrued over the years, you’ll come to understand why this feature was introduced.

To wit, herein be the list of Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s Best Of!

  • #41 on TV Guide’s list of 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time
  • #2 on Empires “50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time” in 2008 and #22 in 2016
  • #27 on The Hollywood Reporters “Hollywood’s 100 Favorite TV Shows”
  • Time magazine’s “100 Best TV Shows of All-Time
  • #38 on TV Guide’s list of the “60 Best Series of All Time”
  • #38 on Rolling Stone’s list of 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time

In addition, Buffy the Vampire Slayer is one of the most celebrated cult TV shows and TV fandoms, as the show ranks at #2 on Entertainment Weekly’s 2009 and 2014 Top Cult TV lists and at #3 on TV Guide’s Top Cult TV list.  Plus, Buffy ranked #49 on TV Guide’s Best Written TV list in 2013, as it is also considered one of the best written (scripted) television series of all time.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we’re back around the water cooler when our Marvel Agents of SHIELD panel, slightly larger and slightly more robust than before, reconvenes to dissect the jam-packed second half of Season 4.  Stay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Buffy the Vampire Slayer – if you somehow haven’t already watched it – is recommended to anyone who loves nerdy, cult science fiction and fantasy (and/or horror) series in the vein of Star Trek, The X-Files, and similar ilk and to any fan of Joss Whedon who hasn’t somehow discovered his first major and most critically and most popularly recognized work of screen fiction (beyond the vastly different film, for which he provided creative input and an early script later overruled by its producers).  As we discuss in this podcast series, this series broke ground for so many other series to come, including other popular shows for which writers and creators learned their trade working on this series originally, including shows like Once Upon a Time and even issue-based comedies, like the uneven but musical Glee. This show has a bit of everything, and, if you love solid, quality television – excellent television, in fact – and you have somehow missed this series, you should make time for Buffy. You will not be disappointed in the overall journey and entertainment value that this well written, well performed series provides.

The entire Buffy series is available to stream at only Hulu, currently. Watch it: you won’t regret it!

PODCAST! – Cult TV! and Best Of! and Looking Back at “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Seasons 1-3: The Buffy-Verse Series, Episode 1 (MAJOR SPOILERS) + Best Written TV (#49)

Image result for buffy the vampire slayer title card season 1

THIS EPISODE OF CPU! WAS SPONSORED BY: HERITAGE THEATRE GROUP

No automatic alt text available.

Check out HTG’s 2017 Season – Currently On Stage: “Measure for Measure”

For more information, visit Heritage Theatre’s website!

Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who: “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” a cult supernatural, fantasy, action, and horror drama that aired on the Warner Bros. network, or “The WB,” from 1997 to 2001 and on the United Paramount Network, or “UPN,” from 2001-2003.

What: “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” follows Buffy Summers (Sarah Michelle Gellar), the latest in a line of young women known as “Vampire Slayers” or simply “Slayers,” called or chosen by fate to battle against vampires, demons, and other forces of darkness.

SYNOPSIS

Buffy’s mystical calling endows her with powers that dramatically enhance physical strength, endurance, agility, healing, intuition, and that provide a limited degree of clairvoyance, usually in the form of prophetic dreams. She is known as a reluctant hero who wants to live a normal life; however, she learns to embrace her destiny as the vampire Slayer.  Buffy receives guidance from her Watcher, Rupert Giles (Anthony Stewart Head), a member of the Watchers’ Council, whose job is to train and guide the Slayers. Giles researches the supernatural creatures that Buffy must face, offers insights into their origins and advice on how to defeat them, and helps her stay in fighting form. Buffy is also helped by friends she meets at Sunnydale High School: Willow Rosenberg (Alyson Hannigan) and Xander Harris (Nicholas Brendon).

The cast of characters grows over the course of the series. A vampire with a soul, Angel (David Boreanaz), is Buffy’s love interest throughout the first three seasons. At Sunnydale High, Buffy meets several other students besides Willow and Xander willing to join her fight for good, an informal group eventually tagged the “Scooby Gang” or “Scoobies.” Cordelia Chase (Charisma Carpenter), the archetypal shallow cheerleader, reluctantly becomes involved. Daniel “Oz” Osbourne (Seth Green) – a fellow student, rock guitarist and werewolf – joins the group through his relationship with Willow. Anya (Emma Caulfield), a former vengeance demon (Anyanka) who specialized in avenging scorned women, becomes Xander’s lover after losing her powers and joins the group in season four. Spike (James Marsters), a vampire, is an old companion of Angelus (Angel) and one of Buffy’s major enemies in early seasons, although they later become allies and lovers.  In fact, Buffy features dozens of recurring characters, both major and minor, and additional regular characters introduced in later seasons.

When: The show aired on the WB from 1997-2001 and on UPN from 2001-2003.

Where: The show is set primarily in fictional Sunnydale, California, home of one of the series’ fictional entrances to hell, otherwise known as “The Hellmouth.”

Why: Listen to the podcast for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  They are all personal and occasionally touching.

How – as in How Much Do We Love this Show?!

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the premiere of one of your Chief CP’s all-time favorite television shows, and since I know a few people in my life who love Buffy as much or (possibly) more than I do, I decided to invite some true Buffy-Verse scholars, in what has, again, become something of a family event, to participate in a five-part podcast series, during which we will take a critical look back at another couple of cult TV shows that fuel our respective imaginations and tug at our TV-loving hearts. In this five-part series, our panel – featuring CPU! regulars and semi-regulars Nick, Kyle, Sarah, and Kallie – look back at Buffy and its spin-off Angel, reminiscing about two shows that have withstood the test of time as personal favorites for several of us and as two of the most nationally and internationally acclaimed television series of all time.

In this first episode of CPU!’s “Buffy-Verse” series, our panel discusses the first three seasons of Buffy, covering the series’ beginning and its initial growing pains and catapult to national popularity.  We discuss our favorite and least favorite episodes within each season and our general impressions of the success of the first three seasons, which aired on Monday and then on Tuesday nights on the WB network.

In addition, with this episode, CPU! is introducing yet another brand new feature, which sort of combines some old features into one handily titled, efficiently truncated format. You may have noticed that we tend to favor some “best of” lists around here.  Well, in this new feature, called “Best Of!,” we are going to handily provide, right here, right now for Buffy but otherwise within the content entry for each podcast episode, the list of all of the “best of” acclaims a show receives.  In addition, we will be compiling those lists on separate bonus pages of our website (accessible by the menu at the top left of the header).  We’re not ready for the pages, as in they are under construction, but when it comes to Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s list of various acclaims accrued over the years, you’ll come to understand why this feature was introduced.

To wit, herein be the list of Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s Best Of!

  • #41 on TV Guide’s list of 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time
  • #2 on Empires “50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time” in 2008 and #22 in 2016
  • #27 on The Hollywood Reporters “Hollywood’s 100 Favorite TV Shows”
  • Time magazine’s “100 Best TV Shows of All-Time
  • #38 on TV Guide’s list of the “60 Best Series of All Time”
  • #38 on Rolling Stone’s list of 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time

In addition, Buffy the Vampire Slayer is one of the most celebrated cult TV shows and TV fandoms, as the show ranks at #2 on Entertainment Weekly’s 2009 and 2014 Top Cult TV lists and at #3 on TV Guide’s Top Cult TV list.  Plus, Buffy ranked #49 on TV Guide’s Best Written TV list in 2013, as it is also considered one of the best written (scripted) television series of all time.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we’re back around the water cooler when our Once Upon a Time panel reconvenes end of season to talk the second half of Season 6 and the major shake-up and soft reboot in store for the fantasy series’ seventh season.  Stay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Buffy the Vampire Slayer – if you somehow haven’t already watched it – is recommended to anyone who loves nerdy, cult science fiction and fantasy (and/or horror) series in the vein of Star Trek, The X-Files, and similar ilk and to any fan of Joss Whedon who hasn’t somehow discovered his first major and most critically and popularly recognized work of screen fiction (beyond the vastly different film, for which he provided creative input later overruled by its producers).  As we discuss in the podcast episode, this series broke ground for so many other series to come, including other popular shows for which writers and creators learned their trade working on this series originally, including shows like Once Upon a Time and even issue-based comedies, like the uneven but musical Glee. This show has a bit of everything, and, if you love solid, quality television – excellent television, in fact – and you have somehow missed this series, you should make time for Buffy. You will not be disappointed in the overall journey and entertainment value that this well written, well performed series provides.

The entire Buffy series is available to stream at only Hulu, currently. Watch it: you won’t regret it!

PODCAST! – Looking Back at “Gilmore Girls” (The Gilmore Girls Life Series, Episode One; MAJOR SPOILERS) + Time Magazine’s 100 Greatest TV Shows of All-TIME + The Hollywood Reporter’s 100 Favorite Shows (#51)

16681613_1887179821514212_9129055661342924959_n

Moderator: Kristen

THE SPECS:

Who: “Gilmore Girls,” a comedy-drama series that aired on the WB, and later the CW, from 2000 to 2007.

What: Created by Amy Sherman-Palladino, the show follows single mother Lorelai Gilmore (Lauren Graham) and her daughter Rory (Alexis Bledel) while living in the fictional town of Stars Hollow, Connecticut.  The series explores issues of family, friendship, and romance, as well as generational divides and social class.  The show’s social commentary manifests most clearly in Lorelai’s difficult relationship with her wealthy, appearance-obsessed parents, Emily and Richard Gilmore (Kelly Bishop and Edward Herrmann), and in Rory’s interactions with the students at private school Chilton Academy and, later, Yale University.

SYNOPSIS

Lorelai Gilmore (Graham) grew up with her old money parents, Richard and Emily (Herrmann and Bishop), in Hartford, Connecticut, but always felt stifled by this environment. At age sixteen, she accidentally became pregnant and, a year later, left home to raise her daughter Rory (Bledel) in the close-knit town of Stars Hollow. Lorelai and Rory are “best friends,” and Lorelai is proud of the independent life she has formed away from her parents.

The contrasting mother–daughter relationships of Emily–Lorelai and Lorelai–Rory become a defining theme of the show. The series also focuses on both girls’ ambitions: Rory to become a journalist and Lorelai to open an inn with her best friend Sookie St. James (Melissa McCarthy). The romantic relationships of the protagonists are another key feature: throughout the series, Lorelai has a “will-they-or-won’t-they” dynamic with both Rory’s father, Christopher Hayden, and her friend, local diner owner Luke Danes (Scott Patterson). In addition, Rory famously has three primary boyfriends during the run of the show: local boy Dean Forrester (Jared Padalecki), bad boy Jess Mariano (Milo Ventimiglia), and wealthy Logan Huntzberger (Matt Czuchry), prompting many fans to vehemently declare their allegiance to whichever handsome partner is their favorite. The quirky townspeople of Stars Hollow are a constant presence in the show and form a comedic backdrop for the larger dramatic events of the story.

When: The show aired for seven seasons, from 2000 to 2007, on the WB and later, in its seventh season, on the newly formed CW.

Where: The show is primarily set in fictional Stars Hollow, Connecticut, though the story frequently drifts to Hartford, Connecticut, where Lorelai’s parents live, and to New Haven, Connecticut, home of Yale University.

Why: Listen to the podcast episode for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Gilmore Girls.

How – as in How Much Do We Love this Show?!

Frequent CPU! contributors and panelists often suggest shows for CPU! to cover in our podcast episodes – loyal listeners should have picked up on this particular trend by now. Well, when streaming service Netflix (they owe us free subscriptions, we think!) decided to rev up the passionate fandom of romantic dramedy Gilmore Girls by producing a revival miniseries for its service featuring every member of the original cast, some of the CPU!ers became decidedly atwitter and began encouraging a Gilmore podcast series in short order.  The trouble was, Chief CP Kylie had never partaken of this particular fan favorite before, and as is my wont, I decided (and needed) to review the show for possible format and addition to our delightfully full schedule of podcast discussions.

As it turns out, I find the show pleasant, like a good cup of warm coffee from Luke’s, but I think I lack passion for it, whereas our most frequent contributor and panelist Kristen abounds in said passion.  In fact, it was Kristen, specifically, who saw an opportunity for a new CPU! podcast series in which CPU! panelists could look back at the program that started it all while looking forward “around the water cooler” as new season(s) of the revival are and/or may be released. Thus, herein we offer the first episode of our own miniseries covering the various versions of this popular, fast-talking, pop-culture-referencing program, which we at CPU! are calling our “Gilmore Girls Life” series.

This time, the Chief CP steps aside from the moderating microphone, so that Kristen may serve as main moderator with the kind of passion this quirky corner of Connecticut deserves, while instead participating as a regular old panelist to remark upon the pleasantness of the whole affair. Kristen and I are, in turn, joined by a familiar panelist – Krista – and two new CPU! panelists, Chelsea (L.) and Samantha.  In this first episode of our “Gilmore Girls Life” series, we discuss our favorite and least favorite moments from the original seven seasons of Gilmore Girls, covering the lives of all of the Lorelais, their friends, their neighbors, their family, and their romantic partners.

This podcast was recorded in March 2017 and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as we cover major plot points throughout the Gilmore Girls series. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we’ll return to our “Gilmore Girls Life” series “Around the Water Cooler” for part two when our panel covers the four movie-length episodes of the Netflix revival/reboot miniseries, Gilmore Girls: A Year in the LifeStay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Gilmore Girls is recommended by the entire panel, though each panelist offers different reason(s) for her recommendation.  The panelists generally describe this series as easy to which to relate; accessible to anyone in terms of ease of finding the series mid-run or watching isolated episodes; offering high re-watch value given the fast-paced, intelligent, somewhat screwball dialogue; and a pleasant, “light” presentation that is generally sweet and tender without being too emotionally exhausting from the dramatic side of the story.  Because the focus within this series centers on mother-daughter relationships over multiple generations, the panel feels that Gilmore Girls could be appreciated by most anyone of most any age.  In fact, the variation in enjoyment between members of the panel, to the extent it exists, is directly related to how amenable to romantic comedies as a genre each panelist is – for Gilmore Girls is still, ultimately, a romantic comedy at heart, preoccupied by the love lives of its main characters, before it is anything else.  Thus, this panel encourages rom-com lovers who have not watched the series to give it a try; others will likely find something they enjoy, even if it takes slightly longer for such viewers to find it.  All original seasons of Gilmore Girls are currently available to stream on Netflix.

PODCAST! – Looking Back at “Full House” (Full/er House Series, Episode One; MAJOR SPOILERS) + The Hollywood Reporter’s 100 Favorite Shows (#76)

Moderator: Kristen

THE SPECS:

Who: “Full House,” a coming of age situation comedy that aired on ABC from 1987 to 1995.

What: Created by Jeff Franklin, the show chronicles a widowed father, Danny Tanner (Bob Saget), who enlists his brother-in-law and best friend to help raise his three daughters.

SYNOPSIS

After his wife is killed in a car accident, news anchorman Danny Tanner (Saget) recruits his brother-in-law Jesse Katsopolis (John Stamos), a rock musician, and best friend Joey Gladstone (Dave Coulier), a stand-up comedian, to help raise his three young daughters: D.J. (Candace Cameron), Stephanie (Jodie Sweetin), and Michelle (Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen) in his San Francisco home. Over time, the three men as well as the children bond and become closer to one another.  Danny is subsequently reassigned from his duties as sports anchor by his television station to become co-host of a local morning television show, “Wake Up, San Francisco,” and is teamed up with Nebraska native Rebecca Donaldson (Lori Loughlin). Jesse and Becky eventually fall in love and get married. Becky later gives birth to twin sons, Nicky and Alex (Blake and Dylan Tuomy-Wilhoit).

When: The show aired for eight seasons from 1987 to 1995 on ABC.

Where: The show is set in San Francisco, California.

Why: Listen to the podcast for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Full House.

How – as in How Much Do We Love this Show?!

So many CPU! regulars, including frequent CPU! contributor and panelist Kristen, love Full House and were particular excited by the Netflix revival of this long dormant sitcom, creating a brand new chapter for the series, which the streaming channel calls Fuller House. In fact, Kristen saw an opportunity for a new CPU! podcast series in which CPU! panelists look back at the program that started it all while looking forward “around the water cooler” as new seasons of the reboot are released.  Thus, herein we offer the first episode of our series covering the various versions of this sitcom, which we at CPU! are calling our “Full/er House” series.

In addition, lacking the ability to fully appreciate Full House age-wise by a few years, the Chief CP steps aside from the moderating microphone, so that Kristen may serve as main moderator with the kind of enthusiasm this juggernaut of nostalgia deserves. Kristen is, in turn, joined by familiar panelists Andrew, Allie, and Amie and two new panelists, Leslie and Jenn.  In this first episode of our “Full/er House” series, we discuss our favorite and least favorite moments from the original Full House, which became an influential television offering in the pantheon of shows immediately embraced by and made synonymous with American Millennials.

This podcast was recorded in December 2016, and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as we cover major plot points and comedic situations throughout the Full House series. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we’ll return to our Full/er House series “Around the Water Cooler” when our panel discusses the first season of the Netflix revival/reboot, Fuller House. Stay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Full House is recommended by the entire panel, though each panelist offers different reason(s) for his/her recommendation. All agreed that this sitcom offers plenty of nostalgia for decades gone by, honest humor to which people can easily relate, and a sense of “aw, shucks” adorableness in the way the situations were presented.  Most of the panelists would hesitate to recommend it to any member of a generation older than Millennial, however, if said member had never seen it, as the panelists believe that the charms of Full House work best on those who grew up with and were children when the show first aired (or on those who are children of those former children).

Full House is not currently available at any of the streaming sites, due in large part to the fact that the show is heavily syndicated on cable television.  In fact, blocks of episodes are aired nearly every night on Nick at Nite (Nickelodeon) starting at 9:00, 10:00, or 11:00 PM and Saturday mornings at 6:00 AM on TBS, so there are plenty of chances to catch up.  As Kristen asks in the episode, though – is there anyone who has never seen Full House? Inquiring minds want to know…out of sheer morbid curiosity – let us know in the comments!

PODCAST! – Discoveries, Recommended by Viewers Like You, and Looking Back at “Six Feet Under” (MAJOR SPOILERS) + The Best Written TV (#18) + Time’s All TIME 100 TV Shows + Empire’s 50 Greatest/Best TV Shows (#27, 2008 & #36, 2016) + The Hollywood Reporter’s 100 Favorite Shows (#29)

5d4010b853c1e6faa8d298ee3b05bb04

Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who: “Six Feet Under,” a drama that aired for five seasons on HBO from 2001-2005.

What: Created and produced by Alan Ball, “Six Feet Under” depicts members of the Fisher family, who run their funeral home in Los Angeles, and their friends and lovers. The series traces these characters’ lives over the course of five years. The ensemble drama stars Peter Krause, Michael C. Hall, Frances Conroy, Lauren Ambrose, Freddy Rodriguez, Mathew St. Patrick, and Rachel Griffiths as the show’s seven central characters.

SYNOPSIS

Nathaniel Samuel “Nate” Fisher, Jr.’s (Krause) funeral director father (Richard Jenkins) dies and bequeaths to him and his brother David (Hall) co-ownership of the family funeral business.  The Fisher clan also includes widow Ruth (Conroy) and daughter Claire (Ambrose).  Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Rodriguez), Nate’s on-again/off-again girlfriend Brenda Chenowith (Griffiths), and David’s long-term boyfriend Keith Charles (St. Patrick).  On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as interpersonal relationships, infidelity, and religion.  At the same time, the show is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical).  Each episode begins with a death – the cause of which ranges from heart attack to murder to sudden infant death syndrome – and that death usually sets the thematic tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath through dark humor and surrealism.

When: The show aired for five seasons from 2001 to 2005 on HBO.

Where: The show is set in Los Angeles, California.

Why: Listen to the podcast for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Six Feet Under.

How – as in How Was It? – THOUGHTS

Via a convoluted path, your Chief Couch Potato discovered Six Feet Under on Amazon Prime/HBO Go during the spring.  My individual, crazy journey started with The Americans and wanting to watch the shows that made its two stars famous. For Keri Russell, that was Felicity (reviewed here), but for Matthew Rhys, it was Brothers & Sisters, which, as you might know, also heavily featured Rachel Griffiths as one of the Walker siblings (sister to Rhys’ Kevin).  I decided to watch the shows that made other members of the Brothers & Sisters cast, several of whom were not appearing in their first television show, famous. Griffiths’ first major television success, prior to Brothers & Sisters, was this acclaimed drama, a show I’ve always wanted to watch but was never able to when it was on due to the fact that I was too poor to have HBO in the era contemporaneous to the first-run airing of this program.

In addition, several people in my life, knowing of my TV addiction, recommended this show to me, as it represented one of their all time favorite shows; some even called Six Feet Under “life changing.”  In fact, a few of those people – specifically Sarah, Andrew, and new panelist Jeremy – volunteered to look back at Six Feet Under around the family dinner table, chatting about how they felt about the quirky but profound drama while enjoying food and drinks and dissecting this critically acclaimed show, which garnered a number of major awards and has since been ranked on several best-of lists (many of which are listed in the title of this post).  This podcast was recorded in July 2016, and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as we cover major plot points throughout all five seasons. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we’ll be around the water cooler while launching a brand new series covering all seasons of American Horror Story, featuring rotating moderators – beginning with the first season, Murder House!  You won’t want to miss it!  Stay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Six Feet Under is recommended by the entire panel universally.  The panelists feel that this TV show, more than most, has at least one thing that any viewer can connect with, in addition to extremely recognizable and interesting characters to which everyone can relate.  Also, there is a balance of light and dark that renders the show engaging.  The panelists further appreciate the “realness” of the subject matter, and the emotions it evokes as a window into others’ potential lives, lives that mirror people the viewer might actually know in real life, set against some of the surreal devices used within the program’s presentation.  The panel characterizes the show as intelligent “non-fluff;” it induces the viewer to think and to feel because it’s well-written, well-performed, and readily and profoundly draws the viewer into its unique world.

Six Feet Under is available to stream on Amazon Prime and HBO Go/Now.  The panelists also note that this drama is a pioneer that paved the way for the creation of some of the high quality television available today.  In fact, true to advertisement by those who have loved it for some time, this show is potentially life-changing and, as the panelists all agree, definitely worth the watch.

PODCAST! – Looking Back at “Desperate Housewives” (MAJOR SPOILERS) + The Hollywood Reporter’s 100 Favorite Shows (#100)

640px-title_card

Moderator: Eddie

THE SPECS:

Who: “Desperate Housewives,” a comedy-drama and mystery series that aired for eight seasons on ABC from 2004-2012.

What: Created and produced by Marc Cherry and ABC Studios, Desperate Housewives follows the lives of a group of women who live in a suburban neighborhood, Wisteria Lane, as seen through the eyes of their late friend and neighbor.

SYNOPSIS

The story line of Desperate Housewives covers thirteen years of the women’s lives over eight seasons, set between the years 2004–2008 and later 2013–2017 (the story arc included a 5-year passage of time, as well as flashbacks ranging from the 1980s to the 2020s). They work through domestic struggles and family life, while facing the secrets, crimes, and mysteries hidden behind the doors of their — at the surface — beautiful and seemingly perfect suburban neighborhood. The series features an ensemble cast, headed by Teri Hatcher as Susan Mayer, Felicity Huffman as Lynette Scavo, Marcia Cross as Bree Van de Kamp, and Eva Longoria as Gabrielle Solis. Brenda Strong narrates the series as the late Mary Alice Young, appearing sporadically in flashbacks or dream sequences.

When: The show aired for eight seasons from 2004 to 2012 on ABC.

Where: The show is set on Wisteria Lane, a street in the fictional town of Fairview in the fictional Eagle State.

Why: Listen to the podcast for the panelists’ individual stories on how they found Desperate Housewives.

How – as in How Was It? – THOUGHTS

As things sometimes happen around here, when contemplating how to cover a show like Desperate Housewives, Chief Couch Potato Kylie had to make some decisions.  This is a show I did watch but also one I ultimately jumped the shark while watching, without finishing, which is something I rarely do. Also, the CPU! podcast panelists are sometimes like a micro sample of the TV-watching public at large: they know what they like to watch, and they’re not afraid to say it!  Thus, as I contemplated, puzzling how to serve Desperate Housewives fairly and in a way listeners might actually enjoy, I soon realized what I had to do.

I know of no bigger fan of this program than frequent panelist Eddie (featured on our Orange is the New Black, How to Get Away with Murder, Once Upon a Time, and True Blood panels), whose passion for the ladies of Wisteria Lane is unrivaled in my personal sphere of acquaintances, friends, and loved ones. Thus, I recruited Eddie to take the reins in moderating this panel, his unbridled passion in tow, as he leads our “Looking Back” discussion about the Housewives, while I sit back and contribute as a regular old panelist along with frequent CPU! panelist Jen.

This podcast was recorded in May 2016, and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as we cover significant plot points that occur throughout all eight seasons. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, and/or our Stitcher Radio channel to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Also: we now have Instagram! (@couchpotatoesunite) and a Pinterest (@cpupodcast). Find us there, if these social media platforms rock your respective socks.  We plan to get groovy on the interwebs elsewhere very soon as well – subscribe, follow, like, and review to stay on top of our newest developments.

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we’ll be around the water cooler and discussing British mystery drama Broadchurch, starring David Tennant.  You won’t want to miss it!  Stay tuned!

RECOMMENDATION

Desperate Housewives is recommended to anyone who enjoys a purely guilty pleasure and television that does not make you think too hard or too much while watching it.  The panel thought soap opera fans would most love the Housewives, including aficionados of ilk like Dynasty, St. Elsewhere, and Melrose Place, though even the stoutest and most fanatical panelists (i.e. everyone but me) acknowledged that the show’s quality declines after the fourth season, owing to the infamous “tornado” and “time jump.”  Still, all the panelists agree that the actresses who play the Housewives give stellar performances and render the show enticing, even when the writing doesn’t match their considerable talents. Desperate Housewives is available to stream on Hulu Plus.  For those who need sudsy and sexy TV in their lives, Desperate Housewives is a can’t-miss!