DC Television Universe (DCTU) Series, Episode Six, 2016-2017 Mid-Season Roundup of “Arrow,” Season Five; “The Flash,” Season Three; “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow,” Season Two; and “Supergirl,” Season Two (MAJOR SPOILERS)

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A new podcast episode of Couch Potatoes Unite!, which is based on a blog of the same name hosted at couchpotatoesunite.wordpress.com. In this episode, our cheeky and feisty and newly full DCTU panel was subjected to (now for) something completely different and highly experimental here at CPU!  Because it was difficult to get everyone together during the mid-season hiatuses (hiati?) due to holidays and jobs and families and a penchant for community theater on this panel, we decided to check in with each other in advance of season’s end–when we would visit each show’s current season in four episodes, one for each show.  This episode is cobbled together in a bit of a different format for this mid-season roundup of all four shows at once.  To wit, your main moderator and Chief CP met with each panelist individually to obtain his/her current, sometimes cursory, assessment of the progress of Season Five of ArrowSeason Three of The Flashand Season Two of DC’s Legends of Tomorrow and Supergirl.  Also, because of the separation and the splicing together of individual interviews, Kylie decided to play a tricksy hobbitses version–Couch Potatoes Unite!’s version–of “The Newlywed Game.”  Just how well do our nerdiest panel contributors know each other? And how would they anticipate their responses to some key questions and potential opinions concerning our favorite current four show TV universe? Take a listen and see.

The episode segments were recorded with our newly full DC Television Universe or DCTU panel – including moderator Kylie, Hilary, Kyle, Spencer, Kristen, and adding (for the first time) frequent CPU! panelist Nick – in February and in March 2017 for this, our sixth episode of our DCTU ongoing series.  If you have not watched any of the DCTU/Arrowverse to date, be aware that there are MAJOR SPOILERS! Tell us what you think in the comments below and check out the blog and YouTube for other TV related discussions, in both podcast and blog format. Also, if there are other shows you’re interested in the blog covering, sound off below! Tell us what you like or don’t like. Keep the discussion going!

The 100 (Seasons 1-3, MAJOR SPOILERS)

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A new (and, yet again, unusually long!) podcast episode of Couch Potatoes Unite!, which is based on a blog of the same name hosted at couchpotatoesunite.wordpress.com. In this episode, recorded in December 2016, our panel of CPU! Skaikru – including moderator Kylie, Allie, Kelsey, and Selene – is Around the Water Cooler and catching up on Seasons 1-3, with particular emphasis on Seasons 2 and 3, of The 100.  We discuss everything from the 100 teen criminals banding together to fend off Grounder attacks, to the introduction of the Grounder clans (and their leader, Lexa), to the exploration of Mount Weather and those humans sheltered from the apocalypse (and the war for the ground), to proliferation of ALIE and the effect that this particularly aggressive artificial intelligence has on Skaikru and Grounder and Mountain Man alike.  If you have not watched any of The 100, be aware that there are MAJOR SPOILERS! Tell us what you think in the comments below and check out the blog and YouTube for other TV related discussions, in both podcast and blog format. Also, if there are other shows you’re interested in the blog covering, sound off below! Tell us what you like or don’t like. Keep the discussion going!

PODCAST! – Around the Water Cooler: “The 100” – Reflections on Season One and Recapping Seasons Two and Three (MAJOR SPOILERS)

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Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who:  “The 100,” currently airs on network TV, specifically on the CW, Wednesdays at 9:00 PM.

What: “The 100,” a science fiction drama set nearly 100 years into the future.  According to the preliminary season one voice-over, in the fictional near future, Earth is ravaged by nuclear warfare, irradiating the planet’s surface. Survivors flee to space stations orbiting the Earth; 100 years into the future, the lives of the mere thousands of the survivors’ descendants aboard the “Ark” are threatened again, as the oxygen and life support reserves dwindle, and the machinery aboard the conglomeration of space stations degrades.  The only hope for the human race centers on the heartiness of 100 adolescent prisoners, chosen for their penchant for breaking the rules, who are sent to the planet’s surface to sniff out whether humanity can return to its original home and persevere.  The 100 are a mixture of society’s elite and its most oppressed; the resulting stew becomes something very similar to Lord of the Flies – except, as the 100 accept and embrace their new-found freedom, they realize they are not alone.

SYNOPSIS

Humanity survives a nuclear holocaust in the fictional near future that irradiates the planet’s surface, sending what remains of the human race into space to fend for their lives aboard several international space stations, which are eventually joined together to become the “Ark.” One hundred years into the future, humanity is in danger once again, as the century-old machinery fails, and oxygen supplies dwindle.  The society aboard the Ark is run under strict rules and laws, including population control and discouragement of defiance of the ruling council and its decrees in any way.  The Council is comprised of, among others, Chancellor Thelonius Jaha (Isaiah Washington) and his Vice Chancellor Marcus Kane (Henry Ian Cusick).  They and the chief medical officer, Dr. Abigail Griffin (Paige Turco), decide to send 100 involuntary participants deemed criminals – adolescents incarcerated for various crimes, including illegal space walks and being an unauthorized second child – in order to test the viability of the planet’s surface to sustain human life. Unfortunately, some of the 100 include the chief medical officer’s daughter and the chancellor’s son, among others.  In addition, once the 100 reach the Earth’s surface, despite the fact that they wear bracelets monitoring their health and vital signs, most of them see their situation as a new lease on life and freedom and remove their bracelets in the hopes that the Ark will leave them for dead.  Only Abby’s daughter, Clarke (Eliza Taylor), fights to communicate with the Ark, while others are content to run wild in a new, anarchic society. These two schools of thought are at odds, even as the 100 confront unexpected inhabitants of the new old world.

When: Season One aired from March 19, 2014, to June 11, 2014; Season Two aired from October 22, 2014, to March 11, 2015; and Season Three aired from January 21, 2016, to May 19, 2016.

Where: The action is set in two locations at the outset of the series: in space, aboard the fictitious space station amalgamation known as the “Ark,” and on Earth, in an unknown location at an unidentified crash site.  The adults eventually travel to Earth, foregoing the dying Ark, and set up a settlement, first called “Camp Jaha” and then “Arkadia.”

Why: The Chief CP is always on the hunt for good science fiction; this show offers less science and more fiction, except where the space station is concerned.  Also, it features Henry Ian Cusick, better known as Desmond from Lost, and I have a great affinity for the Lost alumni.  The podcast panelists that I invited to talk about this show with me all found this program in diverse ways.  Listen to the episode for details.

How – as in How’s It Going? (THOUGHTS…at present)

It’s been a while since CPU! covered The 100, as this is yet another show that CPU! Chief Kylie briefly covered in blog format during season one, here, though below are some key passages reprinted, as I am particularly proud of this review, which provides some relevance and foundation for the beginning of the podcast episode:

“Comparing The 100 to Lord of the Flies is not unfair: this show is essentially William Golding’s classic novel, set in the future and partially in space.  Aboard the Ark, there are two factions of ruling adults: those who mercilessly follow the rules, and those who bend them or break them in favor of following the tenets of compassion and humanity.  On the planet’s surface, there are those juveniles who see following the instructions given to them as the only ticket to salvation, while another school of thought and its members are willing to embrace their more primal instincts, including violence and allowing their rampant hormones to run free.  No one’s wearing animal blood yet, and their survival is threatened by more than the elements and mutated creatures evolved from the fictional nuclear holocaust, but The 100 borrows liberally and unmistakably from an obvious source.

“On the one hand, the tweaked premise shows promise: after all, with shows like Survivor on the air, there is a certain freshness to this story and a real sense that though this is set in the fictional future, it’s a not-too-far-distant future where something like the situation being depicted – the planet, ravaged by humanity’s neglect and misuse of technology resulting in potential survivors to flee to space – might be possible.  Presumably, the target audience is the CW’s usual viewership, the 18-34 set, and there is plenty of teenage angst to pepper the story of individual and global survival.  On the other hand, the characters are rather cookie cutter and caricature-like, particularly Cusick’s Kane, who plays an unfeeling bureaucrat in idiosyncratic surroundings with an over the top flourish (and a passable American accent).  In fact, most of the Ark residents are American – a troubling and narrow vantage point for the show to start from, even if it’s an American-made show.  It seems a bit too convenient that the producers did not invest in a pretend future world with a bit more geographical diversity, even if 100 years somehow unified speaking patterns to be more American aboard the Ark.

“Then, there are the actual adolescents, a veritable mixed bag of acting ability.  Taylor is decently convincing, approaching her role with conviction, as is Thomas McDonell as apparent love interest Finn, but the actor portraying the Chancellor’s son and most of the random supporting cast in the younger bracket seems to be angling for after school special or perhaps B-horror film rather than a thrilling kill-or-be-killed survival tale.  The result is that most of the 100 young adults are simply uninteresting, if not unsympathetic, while the adults, in the two episodes that this viewer has watched, though competent in their performances, offer no complexity, playing their two-dimensional roles well within their two dimensions.  Perhaps time and comfort will permit them to stretch…”

As always, blame it on starting the podcast side of CPU! for the long wait for re-visitation of The 100 and then happily promote the show to podcast panel-ship, along with interested CPU! panelists on board to catch us up.  And we’re getting caught up, finally, which you might notice if you follow our “What We’re Currently Watching” page!

In lieu of that crashed and burnt introduction, then, get a load of our new CPU! podcast episode, as CPU! regulars Allie and Kelsey and brand new panelist Selene gather Around the Water Cooler to chat about this newest entry into the annals of teen dystopian fiction. We play catch up with those that crashed aboard the drop ship on a newer, less apocalyptic Earth of the future and with those who tried to survive in space aboard the Ark before choosing to follow the juveniles they sent ahead of themselves, spanning the time since CPU! last checked in on the first season.  We cover major plot points from seasons one through three: from the 100 teen criminals banding together to fend off Grounder attacks, to the introduction of the Grounder clans (and their leader, Lexa), to the exploration of Mount Weather and those humans sheltered from the apocalypse (and the war for the ground), to proliferation of ALIE and the effect that this particularly aggressive artificial intelligence has on Skaikru and Grounder and Mountain Man alike.  Our panel’s devotion to The 100 admittedly waversas the panelists feel that the quality of this show has, itself, wildly wavered, possibly thrusting its best foot forward in the second season, as the writers toy with a revolving door of violent character deaths in a bleakly harsh world.  Give this latest CPU! episode a listen, with an ear to the ground and an eye toward the sky, and see if you agree or disagree with our thoughts.

This podcast was recorded in December 2016, and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as the panelists cover key plot points of the first three seasons. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly! Our next podcast episode will take another break from our mid-season progress reports as we pause to appreciate an oldie but a goody.  We hang out, down the street, the same old thing, we did last week as we sit in the Circle, in our CPU! sponsored basement, and pontificate nostalgically about (i.e. look back at) That ’70s Show. Stay tuned!

Questions, Impressions, and Future Considerations

1) Is Lexa’s essence, as preserved in ALIE’s construct known as the “City of Light,” truly gone?  Or, did she escape the oncoming onslaught of hostile and devoted chipped humans within the construct? If so, where did she go?

2) Is the entire fourth season going to be centered on a hunt for decaying nuclear power plants?  How can Clarke and company possibly solve the conundrum described by ALIE’s creator, who posed that the nuclear power plants would implode within six months?

3) Are there human survivors in other parts of the former USA?  Other parts of the world? Will we meet any of them in this season?  Are there other Grounder clans (aside from Ice Nation, Treekru, etc.)?  Will we meet them?

4) Why should we care that the Earth is dying, given all of the violence and poor judgment of so many characters on this show?  The writers and producers have to convince several members of our panel to keep watching by giving us a reason to care.

5) Will other characters die?  Will they all die?  Will they survive?  Will they have to go back to space to escape the failing nuclear power plants?

6) Does this show possibly have a fifth season in it?  Our panel votes not so much.

PARTING SHOTS

The 100 seems to have burned bright and fast only to fizzle into wisps of smoke and ash, confronted as it is by a myriad of puzzling writing decisions that may have painted the show into a corner without chance for entertaining recovery.  The panelists in this podcast episode universally agree that this show starts off with a rocky foundation, relying on minimal and lacking character development as the writers and executive producer, Jason Rothenberg, drive quickly toward the main plot arcs without taking time to lay essential character groundwork.  The panelists also universally agree that the second season may have been the program’s best, with a tightly focused, intense, and brutal depiction of a war for the planet that humanity left behind, except and involving the humanity that remained, survived, and now fights for its home.  The panelists agree that the second season presents clear objectives for the many factions and staggering number of main characters that populate this cast.  Yet, the show falters again in the third season as several plot threads and character decisions remiss of logic established by the first two seasons create an impossible situation facing our characters as the season ends, and as the show tentatively embarks upon its fourth season.  In addition, the pacing of the third season is vastly uneven to the point of disengagement for every panelist, and the violence could be characterized as egregious, as most of the panelists feel that the show is striving to be network television’s Game of Thrones equivalent but for the less interesting story motivating the violence.  In fact, overall, the panelists find The 100 derivative of many sources and inspirations (apart from Lord of the Flies) and hampered by the seeming aim of the writers to try to “one up” themselves with each passing episode, to a point that the fourth season must now rely upon Clarke and the rest of her cohorts to prevent a second nuclear annihilation, despite all of the harrowing life and death drama that the characters have faced up until this point. This far-reaching story goal leaves the panel lukewarm and not looking forward to the fourth season; in fact, two of the panelists have nearly entirely jumped the shark, while the other two panelists are electing to persevere for completion’s sake and nothing else.  Will the writers absolve the show’s weaker aspects as The 100 cruises toward season’s end, thereby preventing cancellation?  Or, will the “all over the place” nature of the storytelling continue, despite a lack of consistent success, paving the road toward a series rather than a season end?  How’s the season going so far, since this episode is being published on the night that the third episode of the fourth season airs?  Tell us in the comments!

LOOKING AHEAD

The 100 was renewed for a fourth season, which premiered on February 1, 2017.  Does this yet again delayed premiere, and the show’s inconsistent schedule, signal a death knell for this series? Time will tell, since this program was not one of the CW network’s early renewals. Because of the delayed season premiere, CPU! will not revisit The 100 again until after the fourth season finale, most likely in summer 2017.  As always, CPU! will keep you informed of news and additional 100 coverage.  Until then!

Gotham (Season 3A, “Mad City,” MAJOR SPOILERS)

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A new podcast episode of Couch Potatoes Unite!, which is based on a blog of the same name hosted at couchpotatoesunite.wordpress.com. In this episode, recorded in January 3027, our panel of staunch Batman and comic book enthusiasts – including moderator Kylie, Hilary, Kyle, Spencer, and introducing Nick – is Around the Water Cooler and discussing Season 3A, otherwise known as “Mad City,” of Gotham. If you have not watched any of Gotham, be aware that there are MAJOR SPOILERS! Tell us what you think in the comments below and check out the blog and YouTube for other TV related discussions, in both podcast and blog format. Also, if there are other shows you’re interested in the blog covering, sound off below! Tell us what you like or don’t like. Keep the discussion going!

PODCAST! – Around the Water Cooler: “Gotham,” The Season 3 Mid-Season Recap and Progress Report (MAJOR SPOILERS)

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Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who:  “Gotham” is a crime drama centered on events and characters inspired by the Batman franchise/DC Comic Universe, which airs fall through spring Mondays at 8:00 PM on Fox.

What: “Gotham,” a crime series developed by Bruno Heller and primarily based upon the characters of to-be Gotham City Police Commissioner James Gordon (Ben McKenzie) and Bruce Wayne (David Mazouz), the real life identity of Batman. As originally conceived, the series would have served as a straightforward story of Gordon’s early days on the Gotham City Police Department. The idea evolved not only to include the Wayne character but also to tell the origin stories of several Batman villains, including the Penguin (Robin Lord Taylor), the Riddler (Cory Michael Smith), Catwoman (Camren Bicondova), Poison Ivy, Two-Face, the Scarecrow, Mr. Freeze, Hugo Strange, and the Joker.

SYNOPSIS

A new recruit in the Gotham City Police Department named James Gordon (McKenzie) is paired with veteran detective Harvey Bullock (Donal Logue) to solve one of Gotham City’s highest-profile cases: the murders of Thomas and Martha Wayne. During his investigation, Gordon meets the Waynes’ son Bruce (Mazouz), who is now in the care of his butler, Alfred Pennyworth (Sean Pertwee). Eventually, Gordon is forced to form an unlikely friendship with Bruce, one that will help shape the boy’s future in becoming Batman.

When: The Season Three premiere aired on Monday, September 19, 2016, at 8:00 PM.

Where: The action is set in the fictional metropolis of Gotham City, the primary setting of the Batman franchise.

Why: To find out why individual podcast panelists started watching this show, listen to the podcast episodes embedded below!

As for CPU! Chief Couch Potato Kylie, I picked up this show when shopping for pilots during the 2014-2015 TV season (a yearly ritual for this viewer and this blog, no matter how far behind I am).  I said:

“This is one of the most anticipated pilots of the new season, by critics, fans, and this blogger.  First, as a DC girl, Batman is my second favorite of their properties, after Superman, of course. Second, picking up the story from this prequel point is potentially brilliant; this could be must-see TV for a long time to come, folding in a Smallville like examination of the rise of Batman and the foes he fights, all from the perception of to-be Commissioner Gordon.  I’m super excited for this one and can’t wait to see a full episode.

I asked some fellow panelists to join me in evaluating how effective Gotham is in its storytelling muster and how successful it has been serving as the “prequel” it has become. Scroll down, and take a listen!

How – as in How Was It? – THOUGHTS

CPU! first covered Gotham this time last year by catching up listeners on Season 1 and Season 2A, otherwise known as “The Rise of the Villains” and then by digesting the second half of season two, otherwise known as “The Wrath of the Villains.” If you haven’t caught up on CPU!’s Gotham coverage, listen via the embedded links below:

Seasons 1-2A

Season 2B, The Wrath of the Villains

Since that time, we have had a personnel change on our Gotham panel.  The panel wishes to wave a fond goodbye to panelist Jen, who left the panel because she “jumped the shark” watching Gotham and was frustrated enough not to want to discuss it.  That’s how it rolls from time to time at CPU!  Don’t worry!  If you’re a Jen fan, you can still hear her voice on our active Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD, The Vampire Diaries, Supernatural, The Originals, and Grimm panels and on our Desperate Housewives “Looking Back” episode.  All is not lost, though, as frequent CPU! panelist and sometime moderator Nick jumps aboard the Gotham panel, just in time to masticate upon the latest offering from this non-canon take on the “Batman” story and a full season arc subtitled “Mad City.”

As our Gotham panel, now consisting of Hilary, Kyle, Spencer, and Nick, has previously discussed, Gotham got off to a bumpy start but had since vastly improved in the second season’s first half, as the show seemed to abandon the idea of organized crime warfare on Gotham City streets and concentrate more fully on the origin stories of Batman’s most enterprising arch nemeses.  In fact, the panel began to regard the program, this new addition to the Batman zeitgeist, with various perspectives that intersected even as they differed.  The panel then tackled the second half of the second season, dubbed by the show “The Wrath of the Villains,” and the consensus on the panel was that while the first half of the season was executed successfully if somewhat inconsistently, the season’s second half took a turn, and not necessarily for the better. In this latest episode, we compare notes on the first half of the third season, as we spend time in so-called “Mad City,” and consider the success or lack thereof of the following plot developments: the Bruce Wayne clone, the Court of Owls, Jim’s struggle with identity and with his love for an engaged Lee, Mayor Oswald Kabelput and his Chief of Staff Edward Nygma, and the introduction of Jervis Tetch aka The Mad Hatter (Benedict Samuel), as well as the aftermath following the villains’ so-called wrath in season two.  How did the panel like this first half of the third season?  Listen to the embedded link below to find out.

This podcast was recorded in January 2017, and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as the panelists cover key plot points of the first half of the third season and all episodes that have aired to date. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly!  Next Wednesday, we will offer up another mid-season check-in around the Water Cooler as we discuss Season 8A of The Vampire Diaries, i.e. the first half of the show’s official final season.  Stay tuned!

Questions, Impressions, and Future Considerations

Old Questions/Predictions
1) REPEAT QUESTION: Will Penguin and Riddler have a falling out, which motivates them toward their most sociopathically driven selves?
ANSWER AS OF THE END OF SEASON 2: Surprisingly, Penguin and Riddler stayed friends, supporting each other on occasion in this half of the season.  Penguin ended up in Arkham after confessing to the murder of Galavan to cover for Jim.  Strange brainwashed him (if you want to call it that) into submission; Penguin ended up finding his real dad (played by Paul Reubens), who had fallen victim to a gold-digging former waitress and her sociopathic children. When the presence of a biological son emerged, the new wife poisoned Penguin’s father, who seemed to understand Penguin as no other could.  This murder, once discovered by Oswald, brought out the old Penguin, rather suddenly and menacingly. In the meantime, when Lee began to ask questions about the deceased Miss Kringle not picking up her paychecks, making Jim aware that there was a possible crime to solve, Nygma embraced his most Riddler-esque tendencies and staged riddle-filled capers and committed more murders before Jim finally caught him, clearing Jim’s name and landing Nygma in Arkham.  The moral is: Penguin and Riddler found their psychoses independently of one another, which is a shame because they are infinitely watchable together.
NOT SO FAST! ANSWER AS OF MID-SEASON 3: Well…it seems their mutual affection and cordial friendship have taken a controversial turn.  Penguin, as it turns out, develops a romantic devotion to Edward after Ed offers Penguin some admiration and validation for achieving victory in running for mayor despite being a well-known criminal mastermind, enthralled as Ed is by Penguin’s ability to manipulate the people of Gotham.  In the meantime, Ed only has eyes for women, specifically any and all women who bear more than a passing resemblance to Miss Kringle, the GCPD employee with an affinity for poodle skirts that he strangled in season 2.  When Barbara Kean (Erin Richards) informs Ed of Penguin’s misplaced devotion in an effort to start trouble, a devotion which causes Penguin to order a hit on the Kringle doppelganger Isabella, who could very well have been Ed’s sociopath soulmate, Edward vows to destroy good old Oswald in revenge.  I imagine Ed’s penchant for riddles and a war with Penguin are going to get him where he needs to go to be the fully realized Riddler, while Penguin is pretty much Penguin, angling for power and acceptance but struggling to attain and keep it, the thematic undercurrent of this particular antagonist. The panel hopes that a war between these future arch-villains would be great, but we’re more than a little worried about the ability of this show’s writers to capitalize upon their own potential.

2) REPEAT QUESTION: Will Riddler’s riddles get more complex and mind-twisting?

ANSWER AS OF THE END OF SEASON 2: Riddler’s caper riddles, as he began to frame Jim for the murder of a police officer, were potentially more complex.  Mind-twisting? Eh.  Marginally more mind-twisting, perhaps.
NOT SO FAST! ANSWER AS OF MID-SEASON 3: Though Ed told fewer riddles in this half season, his ire has been irked (see above).  We can only imagine what a provoked and forlorn Ed might riddle when the riddles finally and continuously come.
3) REPEAT PARTIAL QUESTION: What is the takeaway from Jerome, the Joker-not-Joker? Is he alive or really dead?
ANSWER AS OF THE END OF SEASON 2: During this half of the season, Jerome is most definitely considered dead, preserved in one of Hugo Strange’s reanimation tubes in Indian Hill, which, though run by Wayne Enterprises, is located in the basement of Arkham Asylum.  
NOT SO FAST! ANSWER AS OF MID-SEASON 3: The Gotham social media accounts have been foretelling the return of Jerome…

4) REPEAT QUESTION: Are the writers going to treat the nascent Ivy character (who the podcast panel presumes will be Poison Ivy) better?

ANSWER  AS OF THE END OF SEASON 2: Well…this answer is in the eye of the beholder.  Ivy was starting to grow plants in this half of the season and helped Selina and Bruce in some of their escapades, but the pundits have announced that the show is recasting the part. Ivy will apparently be older and sexier, like the Poison Ivy most people know.  The panel is at a loss as to how this could be rendered believable in the story, especially as the writers are not batting at any kind of decent percentage right now in terms of consistency with the source material or, even, with following any of the rules they set up for themselves in this version of the Batman mythology.
NOT SO FAST! ANSWER AS OF MID-SEASON 3: Is making her randomly grow into an awkward, teenage sexpot via the touch of an Indian Hill escapee with the power to make things rapidly age and to drain life constitute treating her better?  Listen to the podcast episode for our panel’s verdict.
5) What is the deal with the long-haired Bruce Wayne clone that we saw in the closing seconds of the season finale?  If he is truly a Bruce clone, with what time and/or energy did Strange make that possible, since Bruce was in Arkham for a relatively short space of time?  If he is Clayface, how did he escape jail after his antics at the GCPD?  If he’s none of these things, what the hell is he, and why are we going there?  Panelist Kyle also made a scary prediction: what if we just saw the creation of whomever will become the Joker because the writers decided to take the yin and yang concept underlying the characters of Batman and Joker too literally? Writers: if this clone will be the Joker, I will plotz.  Rants will be had, verbally and in writing.  As your Chief CP says in the podcast, there is ignoring canon, and then there is stomping and spitting on the canon.  Don’t be tempted to do the latter.
ANSWER: What we do know about the Bruce Wayne clone is that he is, in fact, a Bruce Wayne clone, with similar appearance and affectations, but without Bruce’s memory or personality (what he has of one).  We also know that he has augmented abilities: he’s a reflexive fighter with a mean right hook and can fall off a roof several stories high and land on his feet, not unlike the caped persona Bruce prime will eventually assume. What we do not know is how the Bruce clone came to be and when Hugo Strange (if it was him) had the time to make him. So far, the clone doesn’t seem to be Clayface or a seed for the Joker-to-be, and though he disappeared without a trace or, really, any satisfactory plot development in the third season’s first half, he is expected to return in the second half of the season.  It should be noted that the entire panel finds this plot development strange and off-putting if not downright offensive so far.
6) How will the Court of Owls be explained in the larger context?
ANSWER: They haven’t been – yet.  They clearly pull the marionette strings in Gotham City, but their reach, other than to mobsters like Carmine Falcone, has not been fully flushed out as of yet.
7) What villains emerged from the bus?  There were definite glimpses of Killer Croc and possibly Jerome; also, casting of the Mad Hatter has been announced, and there was already a visual reference to the idea that Strange created the Hatter.  What will they do when they’re out?  Will there be other villains who are NOT created by Strange that we see?
ANSWER: Though pitifully represented, the panel estimates that we saw prototypes of Man-Bat and Killer Croc running around the city.  We have not yet seen a resurrected Jerome as of the recording of this podcast episode, but his return has been widely seeded to social media, so it is only a matter of time.  It is unclear that Hugo Strange, in fact, “created” the Mad Hatter, but he is certainly a fully formed villain and the primary antagonist of Season 3, Part 1.  Mainly, the Indian Hill escapees create havoc at Fish Mooney’s command, becoming part of a brief but anarchic entourage, until either Bounty Hunter Jim Gordon kills them or rounds them up on contract to the GCPD, or the GCPD, led by Harvey Bullock, finds them instead.  As far as non-Strange villains, we see only Mad Hatter, Penguin, and Riddler this half season in addition to the enigmatic Court of Owls and related personnel.  If there are other villains to be introduced that Hugo Strange did not have a hand in creating, we don’t know about them.
8) Did Lee (Morena Baccarin) really have the baby and just lied to Harvey who told Jim that the baby was lost? If so, did she have a girl and name her Barbara?  If so, why the hell would she bother with that name?  If there is no baby or a boy or a girl not named Barbara, the show has some ‘splainin to do.  If there is no baby after all, maybe Lee will get pregnant again.  Will Jim and Lee reconcile?  How?
ANSWER: Lee did not have the baby and did not lie to Harvey when she told him that the baby was lost.  The show, further, did not explain how the baby was lost.  Maybe the baby was put up for adoption?  And Jim Gordon will discover a long-lost baby daughter that her adoptive parents call Barbara?  Or, maybe Lee will get pregnant again.  We just don’t know.  So far, though, Jim and Lee have not reconciled in the slightest.  Listen to the podcast for details.
9) Will Riddler escape from Arkham in the end? And not be made the cartoon character/murderer that he has become?  Will he get some sort of purple and green ensemble for his wardrobe?  The panel also recommends a mask.
ANSWER: As it turns out, Penguin uses his considerable power and influence, which amasses as the unlikely voice of Gotham City’s reason during the Indian Hill fiasco, to convince Arkham officials to declare Mr. Nygma, his “best friend,” sane.  In both gratitude to Oswald as well as admiration for how Oswald’s charisma and ability to play the people of Gotham worked to his advantage, Edward agrees to become Penguin’s campaign manager and then, subsequently, his Chief of Staff when Penguin is ultimately elected mayor in a landslide defeat of incumbent Aubrey James.  So far, Eddie isn’t sporting an overwhelming amount of purple and green, but Cory Michael Smith has teased to social media and fan sites that he may be getting his full Riddler ensemble soon.  One can only hope – and continue to insist on a mask, since Bruce Wayne and Jim Gordon have seen him and know who he is.
10) Is Azrael really dead?  The panel would be really sore if his death sticks.
ANSWER: The panel is sore, so far.  Azrael remains nothing but shrapnel and guts. What we didn’t realize is that Tabitha (Jessica Lucas), his sister, is meant to be the villain Tigress. There are a lot of questionable writing decisions on the part of this writing team.
11) Will Mr. Freeze, Firefly, and any of Strange’s other creations remain mindless goons with identities programmed into them by Strange, or will they emerge as the complex and varied rogues’ gallery that they become?
ANSWER: Mr. Freeze has been presumably knocked out and left for dead, we’re pretty sure we saw Firefly burn once more, and the Indian Hill escapees were, for all intents and purposes, mindless, except when Fish told them what to do.  Complex and varied does not quite sell the salamander here.
12) What will Penguin and his gang aim to do nowadays, especially after he and Butch (Drew Powell) blew up Azrael and after Penguin saw the newly alive Fish?
ANSWER: Oh, you know, stuff and things, like opportunistically capitalizing upon Gotham City’s fear and unrest as the Indian Hill escapees terrorize the city by denouncing GCPD officials and running for mayor.  And winning.  In a landslide.
13) For that matter, what kind of havoc will Fish involve herself in, particularly with her new ability to bend people’s will at her touch?
ANSWER: Essentially, she orders the Indian Hill escapees to do her bidding, but she discovers that her power to control minds via her touch is also killing her.  She breaks Hugo Strange out of a carefully crafted plastic prison that looks like Hannibal Lecter’s containment in The Silence of the Lambs, and, after a confrontation with Penguin when he is tempted to kill her but for her admission that she is proud of what he has become, leaves with Strange into the night, not to be seen nor heard from for the rest of this half of the season.
14) Seriously, will we see Hush or Black Mask?  Are they people that Bruce already knows, such as friends from school?  Or, will the show change their origin stories, too?
ANSWER: So far, we’ve seen neither, and it’s making panelist Kyle grumpy.  Then again, we haven’t seen Bruce go to school in a long while, so we wonder how his grades are doing.
15) Writers: explain the genesis of the newer, more femme fatale Ivy who suddenly becomes and looks older than Bruce, given the recent recasting of the role.  Warning: you have your work cut out for you.
ANSWER: As above, Ivy gets touched by an Indian Hill escapee with the power to drain life.  If this mutant (as the whole sequence has a lilt of “X-Men” derivation) had touched her for a few seconds longer, she would have been dead, but she is saved by an absurdly unsafe manhole cover and a drop to the rushing river below, only to later wash up on shore as an older, arguably sexier, but no less awkward Ivy. It wasn’t completely terrible as far as character developments and transitions go, but the panel’s expectations were quite low, given the corner in which the writers had painted themselves previously.
16) When will Bruce have his inspiration to be Batman?  And how will that happen if he didn’t see bats when he fell into the cave?
ANSWER: Still waiting… And it’s concerning.  Unless the show is positioning Bruce clone to be Batman.  Which would probably cause riots.  Or nasty letters to be sent by CPU!’s Gotham panel.
17) When will Selina have her inspiration to be Catwoman?  She can wait awhile, but since everyone is finding themselves much sooner than they should be, the writers might as well give Selina the idea to be a cat. Maybe she’ll take whatever drug Ivy’s got going on and get all sexy feline on us.
ANSWER: Still waiting… She’s very cat-like, but what makes her Catwoman like?  We may never know at this rate.  Unless her mom has anything to say about it…
18) Will Alfred start training Bruce again – or will Bruce seek his training from other sources?  He’s kind of at the age when he should be throwing more punches.  The panel feels that he needs to catch up to the anarchy around him.
ANSWER: If by “training,” you mean a few more boxing lessons that they show Bruce Prime (or BP) sharing with the Bruce Clone (or the BC).  Seriously…Bruce’s (lack of) progress is a worry for us all.
New Questions
1) Who is the leader of the Court of Owls, the shadowy figure with a ring like Jim Gordon’s father?  Is this person his actual father, alive after being thought long dead?  If not his father, does Jim know him?  Does the audience?
2) Will we see Fish Mooney and Hugo Strange again?  Will Dr. Strange cure Fish’s ailment(s)?  Will he give her a personality makeover?
3) Where did all of the Indian Hill escapees go?  Were any of them truly progenitors of future Batman villains?
4) Will Edward Nygma make his transformation to full Riddler in the coming half season? Will we see a full-blown rivalry and war between Mayor Penguin and Ed, along with Ed’s allies of Barbara Kean, Tabitha Galavan, and Butch Gilzean?
5) Why should we care about Barbara anymore?  Or Tabitha?  Or Butch?  Their ambition is boring, particularly since Barbara remains as off-putting as ever.
6) Where did the BC go, and why would he come back?  Will the show provide any sort of explanation as to when and how – and why – the clone was created?  Did the Court of Owls commission his creation?  For what purpose?
7) Will we see the Mad Hatter again?
8) Who will be the primary villain(s) in Season 3B?
9) Is Lee, who was splattered by an infected Mario’s blood when Jim shot him, in danger of contracting the random blood infection that affected Captain Barnes (Michael Chiklis) and Mario Falcone?
10) Will we see Valerie Vale again?  I don’t think any panel member has a need for it.
11) Will Lee be able to reconcile with Jim now that Jim shot Mario and killed him?  Will Jim face retribution from Carmine?
12) The adventures of Ivy: will she stop killing the plants she professes to love?
13) What is the crystal owl that Selina (Camren Bicondova) stole from the secure vault of the Court of Owls?
14) Why should we care to meet Selina’s mom?

PARTING SHOTS

The CPU! Gotham panel continues to be seriously apprehensive, if not downright uninterested to the point of shark jumping, about the future of this show.  The previous unrest among the panelists, given the writers’ propensity to ignore eighty years of material to write their own version of the Batman mythology, has ballooned into emotions ranging from apathy to disgust, preventing most if not all panel members from being able to recommend watching the show, in good conscience, to anyone.  While the panel would be open to a story that seems to follow a consistent set of rules, no matter how much of a deviation it might be from the Batman comics or franchise proper, there is a general perception that the writers continue to change the direction of the show to compensate for “Twitter reaction.”  In fact, most of the panel still sees the first season and/or the first half of the second season as a high point and regard the third season as a “make it or break it” season for the continued success, in ratings and, thereby, in future renewals, of the show. The panelists continue to advise the writers to revisit not only the Batman comics but also their original blueprint for the show and to establish a structure and story line for the show that rightly capitalizes upon the amazing – and the strongest – performances of the cast (which the panel universally agreed are good if not phenomenal).  Also, the writers need to track their own continuity and not turn what is one of the tightest and most enjoyed (and most widely known) comic book properties into an absurdist’s take on the story, or they will alienate viewers and, thereafter, cause declining ratings and waning network support.

LOOKING AHEAD

Gotham returned from mid-season 3 hiatus on January 16, 2017. The Gotham podcast panel will next reconvene following the third season finale, which will likely air in or around May 2017. The network’s decision about whether or not Gotham will be renewed has not yet been announced as of the publication of this post, but pundits see a 50/50 chance for renewal (and rightly so) based upon current ratings and show progress.  As always, CPU! will keep you informed of news and additional Gotham coverage. Until then!

Grimm (Seasons 3-5, MAJOR SPOILERS)

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A new (and unusually long!) podcast episode of Couch Potatoes Unite!, which is based on a blog of the same name hosted at couchpotatoesunite.wordpress.com. In this episode, recorded in January 2017, our panel of CPU! supernatural and fairy tale enthusiasts – including moderator Kylie, Kristen, Nick, and Jen – is Around the Water Cooler and discussing Seasons 3-5, with particular emphasis on Seasons 4 and 5, of Grimm, from Adalind’s pregnancy with Diana and the consequences of the spell that she underwent to regain her hexenbiest abilities, to the introduction of Trubel, to Monroe and Rosalee’s wedding, to Juliette becoming victim to a spell of Adalind’s, accidentally rendering Juliette a newly born hexenbiest, to Renard’s ping-pong loyalties to Nick, and to Nick’s acquisition of the Grimm artifact that might change the whole game.  If you have not watched any of Grimm, be aware that there are MAJOR SPOILERS! Tell us what you think in the comments below and check out the blog and YouTube for other TV related discussions, in both podcast and blog format. Also, if there are other shows you’re interested in the blog covering, sound off below! Tell us what you like or don’t like. Keep the discussion going!

PODCAST! – Around the Water Cooler: “Grimm” – Reflections on Season Three and Recapping Seasons Four and Five (MAJOR SPOILERS)

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Moderator: Chief Couch Potato Kylie

THE SPECS:

Who: “Grimm” currently airs on network TV, specifically on NBC, Fridays at 8:00 PM.

What: “Grimm,” a supernatural/fantasy drama, wherein supernatural forces, the stuff of nightmarish fairy tales and legends, are disguised as human beings, and only those descended from the original Brothers Grimm, can see – and fight – those beings and their true natures (for a more detailed Synopsis, read here: http://www.aceshowbiz.com/tv/grimm/summary.html).

When: Season Three aired from October 25, 2013, to May 16, 2014; Season Four aired from October 24, 2014, to May 15, 2015; and Season Five aired from October 30, 2015, to May 20, 2016, on NBC.

Where: The show is set in Portland, Oregon.

Why:  The premise of this show has always been intriguing: Grimms are not weavers of fairy tales but are humanity’s last line of defense against the beasts and monsters that haunt our nightmares. This generation’s Grimm is a police detective who stumbles into his family legacy by accident and must adjust what is his mostly normal life to these new abnormalities.  The mythology in this show is steep, meaning it will always be a cult TV show at best, but cult TV tends to appeal to this group of CPU! panelists more than mainstream/non-cult TV, and none of us have been disappointed by Grimm so far…and we continue to be drawn into its mythical and magical world, as the show only gets better in the process.

How – as in How’s It Going? (THOUGHTS…at present)

It’s been a while since CPU! covered Grimm, another of the Chief Couch Potato’s favorite shows; in fact, CPU! Chief Kylie briefly covered the show in blog format during season three, here.  As with some other “catch up” panels, you can blame it on starting a podcast! Or, as before, we can just agree to make this cult favorite centered on supernatural hunters purportedly descended from the Brothers Grimm another candidate for the podcast, especially since your main moderator always plays catch-up but also since some CPU! regulars love this show as much as I do!

Thus, here we present another new CPU! podcast episode and panel, featuring frequent CPU! panelists Kristen, Nick, and Jen. In so doing, we play catch up with the world of Grimm Nick Burkhardt (David Giuntoli), and the merry band of wesen with which he comes into contact (both friend and foe), spanning the time since CPU! last checked in on the third season.  We cover major plot points from seasons three through five: from Adalind’s (Claire Coffee) pregnancy with Diana and the consequences of the spell that she underwent to regain her hexenbiest abilities, to the introduction of Trubel (Jacqueline Toboni), to Monroe (Silas Weir Mitchell) and Rosalee’s (Bree Turner) wedding, to Juliette (Bitsie Tulloch) becoming victim to a spell of Adalind’s, accidentally rendering Juliette a newly born hexenbiest, to Renard’s (Sasha Roiz) ping-pong loyalties to Nick, and to Nick’s acquisition of the Grimm artifact that might change the whole game.  Our panel’s devotion to Grimm is as steadfastly loyal as it is to other genre shows that CPU! coversbased upon the program’s roots to the Brothers Grimm and to the history of monster stories throughout the ages.  Give the new episode a listen, and see if you agree or disagree with our thoughts.

This podcast was recorded in January 2017, and there are, without question, MAJOR SPOILERS, as the panelists cover key plot points of the first three seasons. Listen at your own risk, and let us know what you think by commenting below!

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@cpupodcast), Instagram (@couchpotatoesunite), Pinterest (@cpupodcast), or email us at couchpotatoesunitepodcast@gmail.com – or subscribe to this blog, the YouTube channel, our iTunes channel, our Stitcher Radio channel , and/or find us on Google Play to keep track of brand new episodes.  In the meantime, let us know what you think!  Comment or review us in any of the above forums – we’d love your feedback!

Remember, new episodes and blog posts are published weekly! Our next podcast episode will revisit an ongoing CPU! panel in the same genre, as the newly full Supernatural panel returns to tackle Lucifer’s earthly antics and the return of Mary Winchester in Season 12A. Stay tuned!

Questions, Impressions, and Future Considerations

Old Questions from Prior Season Three Coverage

1) What do the Royals really want with Nick/any remaining Grimms, other than their extinction? Why not just kill him?

ANSWER: This is still a question.  The Royals have taken a back seat throughout Season Five, and in Seasons Three and Four, they were primarily concerned with ensuring that they retained possession of Diana, Adalind and Sean’s daughter, born during the third season.  The panel always believed that the Royals wanted all of the Grimms dead, but these alleged Royals, presumably wesen though the panel is unclear about this, don’t take very feisty actions against Nick as much as against those around him.  Will the Royals return in Season Six, Grimm’s final season, and if they do, what will be their aim? Since the King is dead, who will be in charge? Also, are the Royals actually wesen? Are they behind the pro-wesen terrorist organization Black Claw?  Will Sean, as the illegitimate heir to the wesen throne spearhead what remains of Black Claw and pit himself against Nick? We need some clarification.

2) Will Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio return as Nick’s mom this season [season three]?  The season preview seemed to suggest so.

ANSWER: Nick’s mom, Kelly, did return.  In fact, she helped to protect baby Diana from the Royals by taking custody of her and going into hiding to protect her, as a group known as the Resistance (wesen against the power and corruption of the Royals) saw Diana as a possible savior or weapon in support of their cause.  They also wanted to protect this powerful, magical baby from the clutches of her relatives (Sean is an illegitimate son of the King).

3) How will Juliette deal with all of this – she just started learning all of Nick’s heritage and seems to accept it, despite her pre-magically induced amnesiac doubts?

ANSWER: Juliette, a historically unpopular character, struggled with the truth about Nick to the point that the two were somewhat estranged for a time, though they loved each other deeply.  Unfortunately, events at the end of this season and during seasons four and five complicated their romance further.  Listen to the podcast for details.

4) Now that Adelind has her hexenbiest (witch-like creature) magic back, what is her endgame?

ANSWER: Well, she had it back for awhile, temporarily.  Then, because she needed Nick and his friends to help get Diana back from the Royals, and because she instigated a chain of events that led to Juliette’s accidental conversion to a hexenbiest, she agreed to suppress her abilities to help Juliette.  Unfortunately, it was not a permanent suppression.  Her endgame, though, since season three, has become exclusively about reuniting with and protecting her children (there is more than Diana….listen to the podcast for details).

5) Will the show veer away from “monster of the week” tales into a more mythology-focused storytelling structure?  It may be time to do so: how many new creatures can Nick encounter? Progress is key to longevity, after all.

ANSWER: Like The X-Files, Grimm has found a way to balance both formats, and to incredibly create new wesen concepts all the time, though in season five, the writers have allowed the mythology aspects to flourish.  It was the right call.  The MOW episodes effectively create and establish the world that Grimm inhabits, but it’s the mythology that draws all of the panelists, your moderator included, back repeatedly to watch the show for what will ultimately be all six of its seasons.

New Questions

1.) Will the Royals return in the sixth season?  If they do, what will be their aim?  Are they behind the wesen uprising organization known as “Black Claw?” Who is the ultimate head of “Black Claw?” Is Sean head of both now?  Why?

2) What is the stick that Nick found in the Grimm treasure chest, and what part will it have to play in the coming episodes?  Does it only work when he touches it?  Is it meant for him or for any Grimm?  Is it divine in origin?  Where was it found?  Why do the Grimms have it? Can wesen use it?  Does it heal but also take life away?  So many questions have been raised!

3) Will young Diana, who has grown at an alarming rate, be the “Big Bad” of the final season, with her bratty child demeanor and potent magical ability?  How will Adalind (and Sean) keep her in check?

4) Is Juliette still a hexenbiest? Will she be more Juliette-like since coming into contact with the magical Grimm healing stick?

5) Will there be a war between wesen and humans?  Did Black Claw and the resistance organization Hadrian’s Wall effectively incite one?  Are humans more aware of wesen now?

6) Will Nick end up with Juliette or will he be with Adalind, who he now also loves and who has custody of their son, Kelly (listen to the podcast for details)?  Will Adalind be able to return to Nick?

7) Does Sean really subscribe to Black Claw’s philosophies?  What will he do that he is now mayor, owing to the fact that he “got in bed” with Black Claw, who aims for wesen to live free as the creatures they are?  Who will be promoted to Captain of the South Precinct? Will Hank (Russell Hornsby)?  Will Wu (Reggie Lee)?  Will Nick?

8) Is there a cure for Wu’s lycanthrope condition?  Rosalee said there wasn’t one, but she’s pretty resourceful with spices and teas.  What will happen to him?  What is he, really?

9) Rosalee is pregnant.  Will the baby be half blutbaten, half fuchsbau, or one or the other? Will she be able to have it, since wesen mixing is uncommon?

10) Will baby Kelly be half hexenbiest (or zauberbiest), half Grimm, or one of the other?

11) Will Hank finally find a woman or fall in love with one who doesn’t leave him or physically threaten his life in some way?

12) What is at the end of the tunnels underneath Nick’s secret bunker apartment? Why did we spend so much time worrying about those tunnels, except to set up the other characters’ escape from Black Claw and Sean while Nick stayed behind to fight them when they descended upon the loft?

13) What will Sean do to Nick, since Nick took out all of the Black Claw that came to kill him?

14) What will Nick do to Sean, since Adalind was coerced into leaving Nick with Kelly to be Sean’s political trophy wife and Diana’s caretaker with the promise that Adalind could be reunited with Diana?

15) Will baby Kelly grow as fast as Diana?  Or, was Diana augmented by the spell that Adalind underwent in season three to regain her hexenbiest abilities?  Will these young but presumably magical siblings have to duke it out somehow?  Will Kelly grow at an alarming rate?  Or, will the show time jump during the final season?

16) How will the show end?  Will there be a “happily ever after” for our characters?  Will we lose someone this season?  How will these thirteen episodes shape up?

17) Are Nick and Trubel related after all?  What does the ancient Grimm registry reveal?

18) Will any of the characters end up dying?  The podcast panelists feel that Wu, Monroe, Rosalee, and Adalind are particularly susceptible to possible collateral self-sacrifice because of their histories (Wu has the strange lycanthrope disorder, Monroe and Rosalee constantly run into danger for Nick, and Adalind does the same for her children and may do something self-sacrificing for Nick or even for Juliette, as she has sometimes done in the past).

PARTING SHOTS

Grimm has become appointment television for our devout panelists, should they find themselves at home and with the appetite for a Friday fright night.  It’s still not a perfect program and will never be more than a cult favorite because of its steep mythological aspects and show-specific jargon, but the fan base it has cultivated in six years is voracious and loyal. NBC also continues to allow Hulu and other venues to air full seasons of the show, not just five or six episodes at a time for those looking to catch up, and the entire panel recommends Grimm to anyone who likes anything about the fantasy or horror genres and advises that such genre nerds consider catching up, since the show is almost finished and is available to stream on Amazon Prime and on Hulu. Grimm remains well written and worth the look and has only become better as the seasons have progressed. Also, for those who care, David Giuntoli is quite enjoyable to look at…Anyway, in the end, season six, officially the final season, consists of only thirteen episodes, but our panel believes, cautiously, that they may be the best episodes yet.  In fact, we can’t wait to find out if Grimm goes out on a high note, and we predict that it will.

LOOKING AHEAD

The sixth season of Grimm premiered on January 6, 2017, and has been announced to be the official final season.  The season will consist of a total of thirteen episodes, which will air Fridays on NBC from January through March 2017.  CPU! will return to talk about Grimm in a two-part goodbye series digesting the sixth season and looking back at the series as a whole following the airing of that finale.  Until then!